Threat Detection Update 09-July-2024 | Stamus Networks (2024)

The Week in Review from Stamus Labs

Welcome to the weekly threat detection update report from Stamus Networks. Each week, you will receive this email with a summary of the updates.

Current Stamus Threat Intelligence (STI) release version: 1091

This week, in addition to daily ruleset and IOC updates, we provided Stamus Security Platform customers with the following improved defense(s):

  • New threat detection(s) added [1]: 4 (Fickle Stealer, Poseidon Stealer, Sniffthem, BMANAGER)
  • Major changes to detections(s) [2]: 188
  • Updated threat detection(s) [3]: 235

Note: a "method" as referenced below, is a discrete detection vector for a given threat.

The following detections were added to your Stamus Security Platform (SSP) this past week:

Fickle Stealer (Data Theft)

A new Rust-based information stealer malware called Fickle Stealer has been observed being delivered via multiple attack chains with the goal of harvesting sensitive information from compromised hosts.

Fortinet FortiGuard Labs said it's aware of four different distribution methods -- namely VBA dropper, VBA downloader, link downloader, and executable downloader -- with some of them using a PowerShell script to bypass User Account Control (UAC) and execute Fickle Stealer. Thehackernews

  • Total number of detection methods: 1
  • Kill chain phase(s): command and control

Poseidon Stealer (Data Theft)

On the evening of the 27th of June 2024, the NCSC has observed a large AGOV themed malspam campaign targeting macOS users in Switzerland with Poseidon Stealer.

AGOV is the public service login for Switzerland. It is not only for use in federal settings, but also when dealing with cantonal and communal authorities, for example when completing your tax return. Github

  • Total number of detection methods: 25
  • Kill chain phase(s): actions on objectives, command and control

Sniffthem (Trojan)

A newly surfaced banking trojan named "Sniffthem," also known as Tnaket has emerged on the dark web forums. This Sniffthem trojan, introduced by threat actor oliver909 on the XSS Russian language forum, targets a wide spectrum of Windows operating systems ranging from Windows 7 to the latest Windows 11.

Oliver909’s forum post on June 24, 2024, detailed the capabilities of the banking trojan Sniffthem, highlighting its advanced functionalities designed for financial fraud. Among its notable features, Sniffthem possesses the ability to perform HTML injection, enabling it to compromise websites—even those secured with SSL certificates—by injecting malicious HTML code. This tactic undermines the integrity of supposedly secure web pages, facilitating the theft of sensitive information.

The Cyber Express

  • Total number of detection methods: 3
  • Kill chain phase(s): command and control

BMANAGER (Trojan)

Security researchers from Group-IB have unveiled the operations of a threat actor known as Boolka, whose activities involve deploying sophisticated malware and engaging in web attacks.

According to an advisory published by the company on Friday, the group has been observed exploiting vulnerabilities through SQL injection attacks since 2022, targeting websites across various countries. The malicious scripts injected into these websites are designed to steal data by intercepting user inputs.

In January 2024, Group-IB analysts identified a landing page linked to Boolka’s operations, which distributed the BMANAGER modular Trojan. This discovery led to unmasking Boolka’s malware delivery platform, which leverages the BeEF framework.

The BMANAGER malware suite includes various components such as BMREADER, BMLOG, BMHOOK and BMBACKUP. Each module has a specific function, from logging keystrokes to stealing files, which collectively enhance the threat actor’s capability to extract valuable information from infected systems.

According to Group-IB, the use of PyInstaller and Python 3.11 in creating these modules also indicates high levels of sophistication and customization in Boolka’s malware development capabilities.

To defend against the BMANAGER Trojan and similar threats, organizations should keep their systems and applications updated with the latest security patches, use advanced endpoint protection and antivirus solutions, monitor network traffic and employ intrusion detection systems, and educate employees about phishing and safe browsing practices.

Infosecurity Magazine

BMANAGER - GROUP-IB |

  • Total number of detection methods: 18
  • Kill chain phase(s): command and control

The following detections were updated this past week with changes to kill chain phase(s) or MITRE ATT&CK tactic(s)/technique(s):

Command and Control (Generic CnC)

Adversaries may communicate using a custom command and control protocol instead of encapsulating commands/data in an existing Standard Application Layer Protocol. Implementations include mimicking well-known protocols or developing custom protocols (including raw sockets) on top of fundamental protocols provided by TCP/IP/another standard network stack.

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control, delivery
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control, actions on objectives, delivery, installation
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1071, T1566
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1071, T1587, T1573, T1486, T1496
  • Methods added: 12

CryptBot (Data Theft)

A typical infostealer, capable of obtaining credentials for browsers, crypto currency wallets, browser cookies, credit cards, and creates screenshots of the infected system. All stolen data is bundled into a zip-file that is uploaded to the c2. Malpedia

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control, actions on objectives, delivery
  • Methods added: 10

Fake Browser (Trojan)

Attackers are utilizing hacked web sites that promote fake browser updates to infect targets with banking trojans. In some cases, post exploitation toolkits are later executed to encrypt the compromised network with ransomware.

Between May and September 2019, FireEye has conducted multiple incident response cases where enterprise customers were infected with malware through fake browser updates.

Hacked sites would display these "fakeupdates" through JavaScript alerts that state the user is using an old version of a web browser and that they should download an offered "update" to keep the browser running "smoothly and securely".

bleepingcomputer

  • Added kill chain phase(s): exploitation, command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): delivery, exploitation, command and control
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1189
  • Methods added: 18

Generic Coinminer (Cryptocurrency)

Coinminer is an unwanted malicious software which uses the victim's computational power (CPU and RAM mostly) to mine for coins (for example Monero or Zcash). The malware achieves persistence by adding one of the opensource miners on startup without the victim's consensus. Most sophisticated coin miners use timer settings or cap the CPU usage in order to remain stealthy. Malpedia

  • Added kill chain phase(s): installation
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): actions on objectives, command and control, delivery
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1071
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1496
  • Methods added: 1

Keitaro (Phishing)

Cyber ​​criminals violated the law TDS (Traffic Direction System) platform Keitaro and used it to redirect them users in exploit kits RIG and Fallout in order to infect them with malicious software.

TDS platforms are designed for redirection of users in particular sites. Legitimate TDS platforms, such as Keitaro, are mainly used by individuals and companies that want to advertise services or their products. Platforms drive users to the pages that companies want, targeting specific customers and promoting an ad campaign. techbizweb

  • Added kill chain phase(s): exploitation
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): exploitation, delivery, command and control
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1189
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1587, T1071
  • Methods added: 9

Lumma (Data Theft)

Lumma is an information stealer written in C, sold as a Malware-as-a-Service by LummaC on Russian-speaking underground forums and Telegram since at least August 2022. Lumma's capabilities are those of a classic stealer, with a focus on cryptocurrency wallets, and file grabber capabilities. Malpedia

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): actions on objectives, command and control, installation
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1573, T1071
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1005, T1071, T1573
  • Methods added: 69

NetSupport RAT (RAT)

Remote Access Trojans are programs that provide the capability to allow covert surveillance or the ability to gain unauthorized access to a victim PC. Remote Access Trojans often mimic similar behaviors of keylogger applications by allowing the automated collection of keystrokes, usernames, passwords, screenshots, browser history, emails, chat lots, etc. Remote Access Trojans differ from keyloggers in that they provide the capability for an attacker to gain unauthorized remote access to the victim machine via specially configured communication protocols which are set up upon initial infection of the victim computer. This backdoor into the victim machine can allow an attacker unfettered access, including the ability to monitor user behavior, change computer settings, browse and copy files, utilize the bandwidth (Internet connection) for possible criminal activity, access connected systems, and more. Malwarebytes

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): actions on objectives, command and control, exploitation, installation
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1105
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1587
  • Methods added: 4

Parrot TDS (Trojan)

Parrot TDS acts as a gateway for further malicious campaigns to reach potential victims. In this particular case, the infected sites’ appearances are altered by a campaign called FakeUpdate (also known as SocGholish), which uses JavaScript to display fake notices for users to update their browser, offering an update file for download. The file observed being delivered to victims is a remote access tool. Avast

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control, delivery
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1189
  • Methods added: 3

RAT Generic (RAT)

Remote Access Trojans are programs that provide the capability to allow covert surveillance or the ability to gain unauthorized access to a victim PC. Remote Access Trojans often mimic similar behaviors of keylogger applications by allowing the automated collection of keystrokes, usernames, passwords, screenshots, browser history, emails, chat lots, etc. Remote Access Trojans differ from keyloggers in that they provide the capability for an attacker to gain unauthorized remote access to the victim machine via specially configured communication protocols which are set up upon initial infection of the victim computer. This backdoor into the victim machine can allow an attacker unfettered access, including the ability to monitor user behavior, change computer settings, browse and copy files, utilize the bandwidth (Internet connection) for possible criminal activity, access connected systems, and more. Malwarebytes

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): installation, command and control, actions on objectives, delivery
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1573
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1071, T1041, T1573
  • Methods added: 1

SocGholish (Social Engineering)

It leverages compromised websites and performs some of the most creative fingerprinting checks we’ve seen, before delivering its payload (NetSupport RAT). Malwarebytes

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control, exploitation, delivery, reconnaissance, actions on objectives
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1189
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1027, T1189, T1587
  • Methods added: 4

TA455 (APT)

We took action against a previously unreported hacking group from Iran that targeted or spoofed companies in multiple industries around the world. This included energy companies in Saudi Arabia, Canada, Italy, and Russia; the information technology industry in India and United Arab Emirates; the maritime logistics industry in UAE, Iceland, Norway, Saudi Arabia, US, Israel, and India; telecommunications companies in Saudi Arabia and UAE; and the semiconductor industry in Israel, US, and Germany. This activity had the hallmarks of a well-resourced and persistent operation while obfuscating who’s behind it. This group used similar TTPs to another threat actor dubbed Tortoiseshell that we reported on last year, but in this case we saw different targeting, technical infrastructure, and distinct malware. Meta

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control, installation
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1071
  • Methods added: 6

TA4903 (APT)

An advanced persistent threat (APT) is a stealthy computer network threat actor, typically a nation state or state-sponsored group, which gains unauthorized access to a computer network and remains undetected for an extended period. In recent times, the term may also refer to non-state sponsored groups conducting large-scale targeted intrusions for specific goals.

Such threat actors' motivations are typically political or economic. To date, every major business sector has recorded instances of attacks by advanced actors with specific goals seeking to steal, spy or disrupt. These include government, defense, financial services, legal services, industrial, telecoms, consumer goods, and many more. Some groups utilize traditional espionage vectors, including social engineering, human intelligence and infiltration to gain access to a physical location to enable network attacks. The purpose of these attacks is to place custom malicious code on one or multiple computers for specific tasks.

Source: Wikipedia

  • Added kill chain phase(s): delivery
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): delivery
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1566
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1566
  • Methods added: 12

TA582 (APT)

An advanced persistent threat (APT) is a stealthy computer network threat actor, typically a nation state or state-sponsored group, which gains unauthorized access to a computer network and remains undetected for an extended period. In recent times, the term may also refer to non-state sponsored groups conducting large-scale targeted intrusions for specific goals.

Such threat actors' motivations are typically political or economic. To date, every major business sector has recorded instances of attacks by advanced actors with specific goals seeking to steal, spy or disrupt. These include government, defense, financial services, legal services, industrial, telecoms, consumer goods, and many more. Some groups utilize traditional espionage vectors, including social engineering, human intelligence and infiltration to gain access to a physical location to enable network attacks. The purpose of these attacks is to place custom malicious code on one or multiple computers for specific tasks.

Source: Wikipedia

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Methods added: 3

Unknown APT (APT)

An adversary with sophisticated levels of expertise and significant resources, allowing it through the use of multiple different attack vectors (e.g., cyber, physical, and deception), to generate opportunities to achieve its objectives which are typically to establish and extend its presence within the information technology infrastructure of organizations for purposes of continually exfiltrating information and/or to undermine or impede critical aspects of a mission, program, or organization, or place itself in a position to do so in the future; moreover, the advanced persistent threat pursues its objectives repeatedly over an extended period of time, adapting to a defender’s efforts to resist it, and with determination to maintain the level of interaction needed to execute its objectives. NIST.)

  • Added kill chain phase(s): delivery, command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control, delivery
  • Methods added: 7

XWorm (RAT)

During a routine threat-hunting exercise, Cyble research labs discovered a dark web post where a malware developer was advertising a powerful Windows RAT. Cyble

  • Added kill chain phase(s): command and control
  • Previously supported kill chain phase(s): command and control, delivery
  • MITRE ATT&CK added: T1573
  • Previously existing MITRE ATT&CK: T1573
  • Methods added: 29

The following threat detection(s) were improved this past week with new or updated threat methods.

Name of threatNew coverageTotal coverageLast updated
New Detection methodsKill chain phasesProtocols involvedDetection methodsKill chain phasesProtocols involved
BMANAGER18command and controldns, tls, http18command and controldns, tls, http2024-07-04
Command and Control12command and control, deliverytls524actions on objectives, command and control, delivery, installationdns, http, tcp, tcp-pkt, tls2024-07-05
CryptBot10command and controldns, http, tls71actions on objectives, command and control, deliverydns, http, tls2024-07-06
Fake Browser18exploitation, command and controldns, tls, http710command and control, delivery, exploitationdns, http, tls2024-07-06
Fickle Stealer1command and controlhttp1command and controlhttp2024-07-04
Generic Coinminer1installationhttp22actions on objectives, command and control, delivery, installationdns, http, tcp, tls2024-07-04
Keitaro9exploitationdns, tls, http376command and control, delivery, exploitationdns, http, tls2024-07-03
Lumma69command and controldns, tls, http1237actions on objectives, command and control, installationdns, http, tls2024-07-06
NetSupport RAT4command and controlhttp43actions on objectives, command and control, exploitation, installationdns, http, tls2024-07-04
Parrot TDS3command and controldns, tls, http62command and control, deliverydns, http, tls2024-07-03
Poseidon Stealer25actions on objectives, command and controlhttp, dns, tls25actions on objectives, command and controlhttp, dns, tls2024-07-04
RAT Generic1command and controltcp132actions on objectives, command and control, delivery, installationdns, http, tcp, tcp-pkt, tls, udp2024-07-02
Sniffthem3command and controldns, tls, http3command and controldns, tls, http2024-07-04
SocGholish4command and controldns, tls, http994actions on objectives, command and control, delivery, exploitation, reconnaissancedns, http, tcp, tcp-pkt, tls2024-07-02
TA4556command and control, installationdns, tls, http433command and control, installationdns, http, tls2024-07-04
TA490312deliverydns, tls, http900deliverydns, http, tls2024-07-06
TA5823command and controldns, http, tls127command and controldns, http, tls2024-07-02
Unknown APT7delivery, command and controlhttp, dns, tls76command and control, deliverydns, http, tls2024-07-06
XWorm29command and controldns, tls, tcp-pkt, http1194command and control, deliverydns, http, tcp, tcp-pkt, tls2024-07-06

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Threat Detection Update 09-July-2024 | Stamus Networks (2024)
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